Update to Personal 609 Credit Verification Experiment | The Pickled Ginger


Update to Personal 609 Credit Verification Experiment

by Colleen Elizabeth    

One of my favorite things about blogging has become engaging with my readers. I love the comments and emails I get, and do my best to respond to them timely. I’m not always successful but I am trying, as I realize my success as a blogger is due greatly to you wonderful readers.

Today’s post is just a little update about the 609 Credit Verification Method. I’ve gotten several emails from people with loads of questions. It’s become clear to me that my posts need some clarification. I am working on sitting down and cleaning those posts up, making the information easier to read and understand. In the meantime, let me address the main question or line of questioning I’ve been getting from my readers.

Just about every single question on those posts pertains to specific credit scenarios and if the credit verification letters will work for them. I’d like to take this moment to reiterate that when you write the 609 credit verification letters, it doesn’t matter who incurred the debt on your record or how it was incurred. It doesn’t matter how much debt was incurred. All that matters is that information that is on your credit report is being reported unlawfully unless the credit agency has in their file a hard copy of the contract between you and the credit with your signature. They likely do not have that because these companies are just uploading the information in batches and sending it over electronically to the credit agencies. It’s must faster and cheaper than faxing over the actual contract.

What you are doing is taking advantage of that fact and calling their bluff. You’re not disputing that you owe the money; you’re disputing their right to report it without providing proof that you owe it. The letters are demanding that they send you a copy of the signed contract with your name. The law provides that you are entitled to that. If they can’t produce it, they are legally obligated to delete the item from your record.

I have an update for you regarding my own personal experiment with the verification letters. All three agencies deleted negative items from my records, but I did still have a lien in the “Public Records” section of my reports. It was a huge tax lien that I’ve been negotiating with the IRS after years of trying to fight it. In a nutshell, I did contract work for a large company and paid a third party a huge finder’s fee. The third party didn’t want to pay taxes on the finder’s fee I paid them and manipulated things to make it look like they didn’t get the money. I was naïve at the time and didn’t know much about taxes, and didn’t take the proper steps to document the transaction. Lesson learned. But the outcome was that I ended up fighting a losing battle with the IRS. I decided to give up and am currently in negotiations to settle the lien. In the meantime, it was reported as public record on my credit and looks just as bad as a bankruptcy to prospective lenders.

Well, just for kicks, I included the lien on my 609 credit verification letters, never expecting that it would be removed. To my amazement, I got letters from the credit agencies stating that they did remove the lien! It impacted my score but not by much. But it feels so good to have that removed. I know I still owe it and like I said, I’m currently working on it, but the feeling of freedom from seeing that deleted is incredible.

If you are working on improving your credit score, in addition to making better choices and being more organized, please give these letters a try. I can’t guarantee you that you will have my results, but you will know that you’ve done everything in your power to take control of your own score profile. Give it a try. What have you got to lose?

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